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Archive for the ‘Darpa’ Category

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In keeping with President Barack Obama, the American Government is seeking alternative fuels not only to safeguard the environment, but additionally to “protect America’s national security.” The Navy is starting a major plan to decrease its dependency on oil. In a decade, it wants to power all its planes, vehicles and ships using a 50 percent green fuel blend.


The Navy actually celebrated Earth Day April 22, 2010 by showcasing a flight test of the “Green Hornet,” an F/A-18 Super Hornet jet fighter powered utilizing a biofuel blend. The Navy isn’t on it’s own, the Army too is creating combat vehicles made to run on renewable fuels like biodiesel and ethanol. The Defense Department has devoted $2.7 billion this year alone to improve energy efficiency, reported President Barack Obama. “Here in our country, as politicians in Washington discuss endlessly whether to act to reduce our oil dependency, our very own government has decided that we cannot afford not to,” he said. In short, over the next few years, global oil dynamics may alter the planet once and for all. And This Country is not exempt.

This Nation imports a whopping 56% of its day-to-day petroleum oil needs—over 10.9 million barrels on a daily basis. That’s greater than the entire regular production of Saudi Arabia. But even this number underestimates America’s vulnerability to oil shock. The reason is America imports nearly one fifth of the world’s accessible oil.

•    The US Military uses between 60 and 75 million barrels of petroleum a year.
•    The US Military spends greater than $60 billion a year for jet fuel.

Department of Defense, DARPA, Department of the Navy and also the Air Force are also looking for a replacement for JP-8 grade jet fuel NOW!

And this addiction to foreign oil supplies is set to become even worse. Algae Biofuel is rapidly advancing, Penn State University has tested a new dry algae based fuel and confirmed it does work in combustion engines which have been in the current service of the military, Dry Processed Algae Jet Fuel is the new algae biofuel.

Algae is more than simply pond scum. It’s actually a power source for energy independence. The green mess that forms in deteriorated swimming pools, lakes, ponds and streams has been investigated for attributes beyond the “ugh” factor.

Biofuels are by description any fuel that, by being burned, are easily converted to energy, and that’s produced from a biological origin. Considering a organic source can also be a renewable one, biofuels are reproducible. One type of fuel already being created from biological sources is bio-diesel.

The biofuels that people are very informed about today are the ones that are manufactured from food crops, such as corn. The biggest debate regarding this, among those going green, is too much food is currently being devoted to fuel, when it needs to be allocated for its original purpose, which is to feed humans or animals. While eating is one of the few things we must do to live, having fuel is also very important. Algae biomass also has potential to grow into a mainstream fuel feedstock.

Algae are not a food crops, they grow rapidly and algae remove massive amounts of carbon dioxide and nitrogen from the air.

Therefore , voice your individual support for your hometown, regional and national governments for ongoing investment in algae biofuels research and investment to protect America’s National Security, our country & military are dependent upon it.

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Algae Aviation Fuel from CCA is Proud to Announce Initial Sale of Powdered Algae Jet Fuel to the United States Air Force Research Laboratory. An undisclosed amount of powdered algae fuel will be evaluated as a solid fuel propellant for rocket use.

Compact Contractors for America (CCA), a Southern Utah-based company has developed a dry process biofuel from algae, camelina seed, and other non-fossil fuel sources. Dry process biofuels are essentially powders that can be fluidized and combusted in jet turbine engines. Dry process fuels have been around for a long time, at least since the first pulverized coal power plants. Running engines on burnable powders as opposed to liquid fuel is nothing new. What CCA has done is identify the most effective feedstock’s, process methodology and fuel delivery processes to make dry process biofuels scalable to military operations. Commercial application requires further research and testing.

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Recent tests showed warplanes can fly on bio-fuels

WASHINGTON, May 10 (Reuters) – The Pentagon is working hard to promote development of biomass fuels that could power future fighter jets and other warplanes, but defense officials say it could take years to get a full-fledged industry on its feet.

Algae Powered Jet Engines Future of Aviation

Top U.S. defense officials and executives from the petroleum, alternative fuels and renewable energy sectors are meeting outside Washington this week to address new technology developments and initiatives such as the Pentagon’s work on developing biofuels to power military aircraft.

The long-term goal is to decrease U.S. dependence on foreign crude oil, said Air Force Colonel Francis Rechner, director of operations of the Defense Energy Support Center, run by the Pentagon’s main logistics agency.

Rechner cited the March flight of an Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II attack plane, powered by a mix of biomass and jet fuel, and the flight of the Navy’s “Green Hornet,” a Boeing Co (BA.N) F/A-18 fighter jet powered a blend of jet fuel and a biofuel made of camelina, a hardy U.S. plant.

Both aircraft performed well using the new bio-based fuels, he told Reuters in a telephone interview.

Mark Iden, Rechner’s deputy, said his agency signed an agreement in March with the Air Transport Association, the main industry group for U.S. commercial airlines, to help promote widespread commercialization of environmentally friendly aviation fuels and become less reliant on petroleum.

Together the airline industry and the U.S. military use more than 1.5 million barrels of jet fuel a day.

The challenge now was to promote construction of facilities that could produce large quantities of biofuels using algae, camelina and other plants, Iden said.

He said there was a lot of research and development under way, but it could take years to create a full-fledged industry. “We are literally developing it from scratch,” Iden said, adding he expected the Pentagon to issue an initial solicitation for bids from industry within a year or two.

Iden said the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had spurred interest in the Pentagon’s work on alternative fuels and underscored the importance of alternative fuels.

But the military would rely on petroleum for a long time, he said. “You’re never going to eliminate petroleum.”

Rechner said the Obama administration supported the Pentagon’s efforts, and President Barack Obama in December nominated Sharon Burke, vice president of the Center for a New American Security think tank, to become the Pentagon’s new director of operational energy plans and programs.

That post was aimed at coordinating various energy efficiency and alternative energy programs across the various military services, a good step in the right direction, but Burke’s nomination was being held up by lawmakers, he said. (Reporting by Andrea Shalal-Esa; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

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