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Archive for the ‘Fuel From Algae’ Category

In keeping with President Barack Obama, the American Government is seeking alternative fuels not only to safeguard the environment, but additionally to “protect America’s national security.” The Navy is starting a major plan to decrease its dependency on oil. In a decade, it wants to power all its planes, vehicles and ships using a 50 percent green fuel blend.


The Navy actually celebrated Earth Day April 22, 2010 by showcasing a flight test of the “Green Hornet,” an F/A-18 Super Hornet jet fighter powered utilizing a biofuel blend. The Navy isn’t on it’s own, the Army too is creating combat vehicles made to run on renewable fuels like biodiesel and ethanol. The Defense Department has devoted $2.7 billion this year alone to improve energy efficiency, reported President Barack Obama. “Here in our country, as politicians in Washington discuss endlessly whether to act to reduce our oil dependency, our very own government has decided that we cannot afford not to,” he said. In short, over the next few years, global oil dynamics may alter the planet once and for all. And This Country is not exempt.

This Nation imports a whopping 56% of its day-to-day petroleum oil needs—over 10.9 million barrels on a daily basis. That’s greater than the entire regular production of Saudi Arabia. But even this number underestimates America’s vulnerability to oil shock. The reason is America imports nearly one fifth of the world’s accessible oil.

•    The US Military uses between 60 and 75 million barrels of petroleum a year.
•    The US Military spends greater than $60 billion a year for jet fuel.

Department of Defense, DARPA, Department of the Navy and also the Air Force are also looking for a replacement for JP-8 grade jet fuel NOW!

And this addiction to foreign oil supplies is set to become even worse. Algae Biofuel is rapidly advancing, Penn State University has tested a new dry algae based fuel and confirmed it does work in combustion engines which have been in the current service of the military, Dry Processed Algae Jet Fuel is the new algae biofuel.

Algae is more than simply pond scum. It’s actually a power source for energy independence. The green mess that forms in deteriorated swimming pools, lakes, ponds and streams has been investigated for attributes beyond the “ugh” factor.

Biofuels are by description any fuel that, by being burned, are easily converted to energy, and that’s produced from a biological origin. Considering a organic source can also be a renewable one, biofuels are reproducible. One type of fuel already being created from biological sources is bio-diesel.

The biofuels that people are very informed about today are the ones that are manufactured from food crops, such as corn. The biggest debate regarding this, among those going green, is too much food is currently being devoted to fuel, when it needs to be allocated for its original purpose, which is to feed humans or animals. While eating is one of the few things we must do to live, having fuel is also very important. Algae biomass also has potential to grow into a mainstream fuel feedstock.

Algae are not a food crops, they grow rapidly and algae remove massive amounts of carbon dioxide and nitrogen from the air.

Therefore , voice your individual support for your hometown, regional and national governments for ongoing investment in algae biofuels research and investment to protect America’s National Security, our country & military are dependent upon it.

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Recent tests showed warplanes can fly on bio-fuels

WASHINGTON, May 10 (Reuters) – The Pentagon is working hard to promote development of biomass fuels that could power future fighter jets and other warplanes, but defense officials say it could take years to get a full-fledged industry on its feet.

Algae Powered Jet Engines Future of Aviation

Top U.S. defense officials and executives from the petroleum, alternative fuels and renewable energy sectors are meeting outside Washington this week to address new technology developments and initiatives such as the Pentagon’s work on developing biofuels to power military aircraft.

The long-term goal is to decrease U.S. dependence on foreign crude oil, said Air Force Colonel Francis Rechner, director of operations of the Defense Energy Support Center, run by the Pentagon’s main logistics agency.

Rechner cited the March flight of an Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II attack plane, powered by a mix of biomass and jet fuel, and the flight of the Navy’s “Green Hornet,” a Boeing Co (BA.N) F/A-18 fighter jet powered a blend of jet fuel and a biofuel made of camelina, a hardy U.S. plant.

Both aircraft performed well using the new bio-based fuels, he told Reuters in a telephone interview.

Mark Iden, Rechner’s deputy, said his agency signed an agreement in March with the Air Transport Association, the main industry group for U.S. commercial airlines, to help promote widespread commercialization of environmentally friendly aviation fuels and become less reliant on petroleum.

Together the airline industry and the U.S. military use more than 1.5 million barrels of jet fuel a day.

The challenge now was to promote construction of facilities that could produce large quantities of biofuels using algae, camelina and other plants, Iden said.

He said there was a lot of research and development under way, but it could take years to create a full-fledged industry. “We are literally developing it from scratch,” Iden said, adding he expected the Pentagon to issue an initial solicitation for bids from industry within a year or two.

Iden said the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had spurred interest in the Pentagon’s work on alternative fuels and underscored the importance of alternative fuels.

But the military would rely on petroleum for a long time, he said. “You’re never going to eliminate petroleum.”

Rechner said the Obama administration supported the Pentagon’s efforts, and President Barack Obama in December nominated Sharon Burke, vice president of the Center for a New American Security think tank, to become the Pentagon’s new director of operational energy plans and programs.

That post was aimed at coordinating various energy efficiency and alternative energy programs across the various military services, a good step in the right direction, but Burke’s nomination was being held up by lawmakers, he said. (Reporting by Andrea Shalal-Esa; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

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Air New Zealand and Boeing are secretly working to create the world’s first green aviation fuel, made of wild algae. The fuel is essentially derived from bacterial pond scum created through the photosynthesis of sunlight and carbon dioxide on nutrient-rich water sources such as sewage ponds. The company providing the biofuel is Aquaflow Bionomic Corporation. If the project pans out the small and relatively new New Zealand company could lead the world in environmentally sustainable aviation fuel.

Algae Jet Fuel

Compact Contractors of America have developed a Dry Process Algae Bio Jet Fuel for ground power turbine or air frames. They are currently seeking governmental entry to either direct testing or further development to meet the AirForce and Naval flight demands.

Air New Zealand may be the first to test these new algae fuels on their engine while normal aviation fuel would drive the other engine. Fuel is held in cells on the aircraft that can be directed to a specific engine.

None of the parties involved will talk about the joint venture development because of confidentiality agreements but whispers about the project were circulating at the roll-out of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner in Seattle in the US last week. However CCA is open and ready to accept new testing platforms.

Local Marlborough media reported a visit by Boeing to Aquaflow earlier this year and Boeing has stated publicly since then that it believes algae is the airline fuel of the future.

Richard Branson’s Virgin Fuels announced in April it was working with Boeing to demonstrate biofuel in a 747-400. The focus is on testing algae-derived jet fuel, especially its freezing point.

CCA states their fuel actually works better the colder it is. The differences in algae fuel will help the aviation industry in dry or liquid forms.

Boeing’s Dave Daggett was reported this year as saying algae ponds with a total of 34,000 square kilometers could produce enough fuel to reduce the net CO2 footprint for all of aviation to zero.

Until now the relatively new Blenheim company’s focus has been on biodiesel for cars, trucks, buses and boats. CCA has aimed it sights squarely on military drone applications and ground power for in theater production and utilization.

English Environment Minister David Parker drew public attention to the company in December when he test drove a Land Rover around that was powered by Aquaflow’s blend of algae biofuel and diesel (5% algae fuel and 95% conventional fuel) just a year after it was developed. CCA has to date has live fired tested it’s fuel in non military jet engines but is planning a test with military grade turbine jet engines in the near future.

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Robert Fulton, the 19th century engineer of steamboat fame, didn’t invent the technology. He just improved it to make steamboats faster and commercially viable. Some day soon, distant descendent Robert Fulton III of Cedar City, UT hopes to make the same claim for making alternative fuels more effective and profitable.

 

Powdered Algae Jet Fuel From CCA

Fulton works for Compact Contractors for America (CCA), a Southern Utah-based company that is developing dry process biofuels from algae, camelina seed, and other non-fossil fuel sources. Dry process biofuels are essentially powders that can be injected and combusted in jet turbines and other engines. April 29th, CCA will exhibit and demonstrate the fuel at the Milford Renewable Energy Fair hosted by the Southwest Utah Renewable Energy Center.

“Dry process fuels have been around for a long time, at least since the first pulverized coal power plants,” Fulton said. “Running engines on burnable powders as opposed to liquid fuel is nothing new. What we’re trying to do is to identify the most effective feedstocks, rendering and fuel-injection processes to make dry process biofuels scalable to commercial and military operations.”

Powdered Algae Jet Fuel Test Video CLICK HERE TO WATCH!

The advantage dry process biofuels may have over liquid biofuels is a more streamlined and potentially less expensive preparation process, Fulton said. Dewatering the feedstock takes less energy, and no catalytic “cracking” is needed to create a liquid fuel. According to Fulton, CCA is focused initially on the aviation market, and in particular on providing dry process fuels for unmanned military vehicles.

“The military is very open to finding new alternative sources of fuel that promote our country’s energy independence,” Fulton said. “We’re trying to capitalize on that interest.”

USTAR recently funded a $39,000 Technology Commercialization Grant at Southern Utah University (SUU) to assist CCA in testing different algae strains and camelina feedstock. Initial tests have been promising, according the SUU chemistry professor Renwu Zhang. In general, the processed strains provided ample combustion heat with only minor residue.

Out-of-state experts have also tested CCA’s processed strains. Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Lab faculty member Thomas Cawley recently tested samples for injection system delivery. The CCA material showed promise for high-pressure combustion use and appeared to have little moisture sensitivity, meaning the end product is less likely to clump or jam in commercial use.

In a related effort, Montana State University has provided camelina meal samples to Southern Utah University for testing on CCA’s behalf. Combustion testing results yielded great potential for a camelina-based dry fuel.

The most recent milestone CCA has achieved is the signing April 24th of a research agreement with SOLIX Biofuels, Inc. of Colorado. SOLIX will provide algae samples for larger-scale, production tests. “SOLIX is well known nationally,” Fulton said. “Working with such an established commercial player is pretty exciting for us.”

From connections to university experts to market assessment and branding, Fulton speaks well of his interaction with USTAR. “The grant funding has been critical in allowing us to move forward, and having state support for SUU’s testing project has positioned us well with outside companies such as SOLIX.”

“USTAR has also provided some invaluable feedback on our business plan, and has helped us target the military aviation market. That advice alone has helped focus our efforts more effectively,” he said.

CCA’s exhibit at the Milford Renewable Energy Fair will be at Milford High School from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, Thursday, April 29th. For more information on the fair, visit www.swatc.edu/renewableenergyfair.shtml. For more information on CCA, contact robertfulton@bresnan.net or visit his site at http://algaeaviationfuel.com/. Originally Published by USTAR 4/29/2010 http://newmedia.innovationutah.com/2010/04/29/powdered-algae-biofuel-on-display-at-milford-renewable-energy-fair/

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According to president Obama, the Pentagon isn’t seeking “homegrown” alternative fuels just to protect the environment, but to “protect America’s national security.” The Navy is embarking on a radical plan to reduce its dependency on oil. In 10 years, it wants to be able to power all its planes, vehicles and ships using a 50 percent alternative fuel.

The Future of Modern Flight


The Navy isn’t alone. The Army too is developing combat vehicles designed to run on fuels like biodiesel and ethanol. The Defense Department has invested $2.7 billion this year alone to improve energy efficiency, reported President Obama. “Here at home, as politicians in Washington debate endlessly whether to act to reduce our oil dependency, our own military has determined that we can’t afford not to,” he said.

In short, over the next several years, global oil dynamics may change the planet forever. And America will not be immune.

The United States imports a whopping 56 percent of its daily oil needs—over 10.9 million barrels per day. That is more than the total daily production of Saudi Arabia. But even this number underestimates America’s vulnerability to oil shock. That is because America imports close to one fifth of the world’s available oil.

And this dependence on foreign oil supplies is set to get worse. America’s oil fields are rapidly going dry. Algae fuel is rapidly advancing now, it is no longer a future fuel, it is the right now fuel. Utah based Compact Contractors for America, LLC has developed a fuel based on algal biomass, not oil. Penn State has tested the new algae based fuel and confirmed it does work in combustion engines the military currently uses to protect our country and way of life. Dry Processed Algae Jet Fuel is the now fuel.

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Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative (USTAR) and it’s Governing Authority Awarded a Technology Commercialization Grant (TCG) to CCA for Dry Process Bio Jet Fuel from Algae Projet.

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Have you ever gone fishing only to discover that your favorite fishing hole was over grown with algae? Well now that same green algae can power jet turbine engine or diesel engine trucks. That’s right the algae grown in ponds can be converted to oil and the oil refined into Biofuels for jet aircraft and automobiles.

Algae have the potential to evolve into a mainstream fuel feedstock. Algae are not a food crops, they grow fast and algae remove massive amounts of carbon dioxide from the air.

Algae are not a food crops and there has been a huge debate and more focus on the food vs. fuel question. Some critics say agricultural based crops are not sustainable as a fuel source. Corn and Soybeans are being used currently as Biofuel which some say are the blame for higher food prices. For example; some waste collections companies have seen the cost of WVO (Waste vegetable oil) or yellow grease increase to an all time high worth as much as $3.50 cents per gallon. Hey!! Correct me if my math is a little off, but isn’t that almost the same price as a gallon of diesel fuel? Algae farms can produce 100 times more oil per acre than traditional oil crops (such as soy oil), which can be converted to Biodiesel.

Algae grow fast. Algae can be grown especially well in desert states that have plenty of sunshine and access to water unusable for drinking. Because of the high salt content in algae, saltwater can be used more economically than fresh water for optimal growth. Meaning our sunny southern states with saline aquifers will make fast and efficient locations to grow algae on commercial farms.

Algae remove massive amounts of CO2 (Carbon dioxide) from the air. Algae farms are glutton eaters of CO2 gas providing a means for recycling waste carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion. It is possible to sequester as much as one billion tons of CO2 per year from algae farms. The United States has one energy plant that produces 25.3 millions tons of CO2 by itself. This new technology has attracted companies that need inexpensive CO2 sequestration solutions. Algae was responsible for creating the Earth’s oxygen atmosphere three billion years ago and it took around two billion years to form the modern atmosphere with 20 percent oxygen. Without algae we would not be here.

Algae Biofuel will play a very important part in meeting the worlds growing energy need, Algae has a place in not only our past, but in our future as well.

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Algae Aviation Fuel

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) helped to develop the internet and satellite navigation systems, has taken industry insiders by surprise. A cheap, low-carbon fuel would not only help the US military, the nation’s single largest consumer of energy, to wean itself off its oil addiction, but would also hold the promise of low-carbon driving and flying for all.

Darpa’s research projects have already extracted oil from algal ponds at a cost of $2 per gallon. It is now on track to begin large-scale refining of that oil into jet fuel, at a cost of less than $3 a gallon, according to Barbara McQuiston, special assistant for energy at Darpa. That could turn a promising technology into a market-ready one. Researchers have cracked the problem of turning pond scum and seaweed into fuel, but finding a cost-effective method of mass production could be a game-changer. “Everyone is well aware that a lot of things were started in the military,” McQuiston said.

Never underestimate the ability of the not-so-sexy solutions–algae grown and turned into fuel, flywheels or pumped storage to help time shift supply to better meet electricity demand, taking simple efficiency steps, etc.–to deliver some impressive contributions to our energy and environmental challenges once we feel sufficient urgency to take them. In fact, I expect algae fuel to play a much bigger part in our future transportation alternatives than the car companies’ (and semi-informed technophile’s) favorite hobby horse, hydrogen.

As for the claim of $3/gallon jet fuel from algae in “just months”, consider me highly skeptical, to put it mildly. I’m sure that the claim is a reference to being able to hit that price point, not real world production in any significant quantity. Even so, it’s one hell of a claim, and it’s either a gross overstatement of what DARPA’s been up to, or it’s a revelation that they’ve pulled a techno-rabbit out of their hat.

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